Voices After the Premiere of "I Love Chopin"

The premiere of "I Love Chopin" has garnered praise from various critics. Here are some of their thoughts:

'I Love Chopin' is a performance about love – love for people, music, experiences, emotions, and memories. This sentiment can be easily attributed to those reminiscing about the genius musician, as well as the creators and artists working for the Wrocław Mime Theatre. - Michał Derkacz dlaStudenta.pl 

Without a doubt, 'I Love Chopin' creates a space for the dynamic development of innovation in the realms of pantomime and dance. The hybridization of specific artistic means is precisely utilized in the performance. The artists show us that the body is infinitely diverse. The director succeeds in exploring hidden content or new interpretative keys to Chopin's life and work. What emerges is a successful story about love, fear, escaping it, and the search for freedom. 'I Love Chopin' refers to artifacts of the past, confronting the here and now. The meeting at the border of forms and ideas is fulfilling and moving, striving to keep up with the ever-elusive reality. Contrary to complaints about the status of dance, actions, interactions, strategies for liberating gestures, feelings, thoughts, all impact the sphere of interpersonal activity, leading to communication with others, often in difficult, everyday social practices, and sometimes in systems that love prohibitions and one-dimensional situations. The Wrocław Mime Theatre deserves all possible spaces to present its performances, and the development of new artistic strategies is impressive in its dynamism and consistency. - Adam Kamiński.

The director balances between two extreme experiences – laughter and emotion – throughout the performance, and the acting ensemble skillfully navigates these extremes, always hitting the mark and perfectly choosing the means. It’s just like in a brilliantly constructed musical composition. - Katarzyna Mikołajewska Wyborcza.pl Wrocław 

 

I LOVE CHOPIN, fot. Natalia Kabanow

I LOVE CHOPIN, fot. Natalia Kabanow 

This performance features grand, moving scenes. A dramatically intense vision of the wasted life of an old rhythmics teacher (a showcase of acting combined with pantomime elements by Jan Kochanowski), a lustful-sadistic piano lesson scene with a lolita-like student, or rather an acolyte (the frenetic yet audience-amusing duo of Jan Kochanowski and Karolina Paczkowska), and a hilariously absurd lesson in disciplining students (excellent Jakub Pewiński as a chav) by a strict teacher (domineering Jan Kochanowski), who, on stage, creates a perverse sadistic show with the students, reminiscent of TV shows like 'Got Talent' or 'The Voice of Kids'. - Ewa Mecner Artystyczne spojrzenie 

We get a queer Chopin, extracted from the national canon and immersed in intimate, subjective experience. Chopin's music here reveals tender spots in characters drawn with bold strokes. This is the most powerful effect of the show – a gallery of cartoonishly exaggerated characters (remarkable costumes by Rafał Domagała). Just when we are almost certain that we are in for a mockery not of the composer himself but of his public image, there is a sudden shift in convention, a reversal of rules, and instead of laughter, we are moved to tears. - Magda Piekarska Gazeta Wyborcza

I love Chopin, reż. Jędrzej Piaskowski, dram. Hubert Sulima, fot. Natalia Kabanow

Photo by Natalia Kabanow

It’s also worth mentioning the excellent humor that accompanies most of the scenes involving Sara Celler-Jezierska. The character she plays is driven almost to absurdity, as she converses with Chopin at his grave. Her strictness towards the students doesn't evoke anxiety or irritation in the audience, but rather indulgence and laughter. Humor helps to dissipate the tension that might accumulate among the viewers. - Martyna Jersz WroclawskiPortal.pl

Special mention must go to all the role portrayals by Eloy Moreno Gallego, who transforms unrecognizably on stage. He starts as a Fly, then presents himself as a teenage student at an art school, and finally astonishes the audience with the role of Dina Alma de Paradeda. - Krzysztof Antonik Teatrealnie.pl 

I love Chopin, reż. Jędrzej Piaskowski, dram. Hubert Sulima, fot. Natalia Kabanow

Photo by Natalia Kabanow

Although the main character of the performance repeatedly declares her boundless love for Chopin, the show focuses on a new interpretation of this great artist's biography. This serves as a pretext for a broader look at the superficial aspect of myth-making and the selective nature of patriotic consciousness. Chopin's love letters to Tytus Woyciechowski indicate his non-heteronormativity. This is the main theme of Piaskowski and Sulima's performance – the exclusion of queer sexuality from the national cultural canon, from grand history, but also from everyday life. The play proposes a change in the perception of national mythologies, incorporating inconvenient truths for its propagators. (...) The ensemble of the Wrocław Mime Theatre (along with guest performer Celler-Jezierska) showcases their acting skills. Everyone fits perfectly into the extraordinary concept of Sulima and Piaskowski, resulting in a boldly conceived and excellently executed performance. This season at the Wrocław Mime Theatre was exceptional and truly outstanding. - Mateusz Michalski [na.sztuki]